"Die Christians!" This letter is posted on the homes of Christians in Mosul. Leave, convert or die! The media refuses to acknowledge this atrocity. Radical Muslim terrorists have systemically removed Christians from their ancient homeland, and nobody stands to challenge them.

    Unfortunately, secular humanity is blinded by their bigotry against Christians that they refuse to acknowledge the great suffering if Christians in the middle East. Please share, lives are lost needlessly.

    • 2 days ago
    • 9

    theorthodoxbritreturns:

    Islamists from ISIS burnt out the insidse and remove the cross from the Armenian Catholic Church of the Martyrs in Raqqa, replacing the crosses with ISIS flags.

    In the last month, ISIS have destroyed most of the Ancient Churches in their territory, focing the Christians of their ancient homelands to leave the area with the choice of “Convert, Leave or Die,”

    As of 16:55 GMT today (20/7/14) the last Christian family has left Mosul, after over 100 families who refused to leave were forcibly removed from their homes, many dying in the process.

    Over 1400 years ago the Christians in this area feared their deaths with the rise of the “Heresy of the Ishmaelites” and demands of the Dhimmi system, now this has returned in an ever more violent fashion.

    Lord Have Mercy

    • 4 days ago
    • 1217

    The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, I recommend this to people who want to pray the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) but find it confuing as they are just beginning. It’s praying the prayer of the Church with Mary #SaturdaysareforMary #BVM #BlessedVirginMary #OurLady #DivineOffice #LiturgyoftheHours

    • 5 days ago
    • 6

    They arrived. Thanks Dan Diego Printers! Thanks @ta_c87

    • 1 week ago

    #campemmaus2014 doing my priest thing doing my hip hop thing.

    • 2 weeks ago
    • 6

    Are there other priests / Augustinian around your age?

    One of the most frequent questions I get from people I know IRL is done variation of this. They know I’m probably one of the younger guys. I am the youngest in my house. In my province there are a handful of younger students. In the world there are probably hundreds of Augustinian Priests younger than me particular in Latin America. I know I’ve met several.

    Behind this question, is this idea that it would be difficult, challenging, impossible, to not live with people closer to my age. Or it would be unbearable or unreasonable to have to live with a bunch of senior citizens. I mean don’t we shut them all off to some godforsaken launching pad so we don’t have to deal with our own mortality the reality that we will eventually become ugly and wrinkled and shriveled. I mean don’t we inherently deserve a cosmetically attractive society in which to live?

    I believe that everyone would be so much better off if they spent a considerable amount of time with older people. Obviously, if you spend more time with your grandparents or other seniors, you could sit around and ask for some of their wisdom. But I think most of all, young people are so anxious about so many things thrown out to see without a paddle, lonely, terrified, cold, I’m sure of themselves, unsure of their future. On the other hand, elders have been through it all, they don’t let nothing bother them. If you spent more time around then it probably absorb some of their positive energy. And instead of crying and worrying about things not going right, you’re probably be sitting there laughing with these old people about how things are going to work out.

    • 1 month ago
    • 3

    If you use Twitter, this is one of the Twitter accounts I run @FriarFriend I tweet quotes from St Augustine, prayers from the Liturgy of the Hits and the Augustinian tradition. Looks like today is the Feast of the Holy Trinity!

    • 1 month ago
    • 4

    "Hey #Bishop, take a #selfie with me real quick." Thank you to #Augustinian Bishop Alberto Bochetay OSA who directed or province retreat this week!

    • 1 month ago
    • 5
    goandannouce:

A Saint a day: June 9
St. Ephrem


Died: 373?

"I was born in the way of truth: though my childhood was unaware of the greatness of the benefit, I knew it when trial came."
Ephrem (or Eprhaim) the Syrian left us hundreds of hymns and poems on the faith that inflamed and inspired the whole Church, but few facts about his own inspiring life.
Most historians infer from the lines quoted above that Ephrem was born into a Christian family — although not baptized until an adult (the trial or furnace), which was common at the time. Other than that little is known about his birth and youth although many guess he was born in the early fourth century in Mesopotamia, possibly in Nisibis where he spent most of his adult life.
Ephrem served as teacher, and possibly deacon, under four bishops of Nisibis, Jacob, Babu, Vologeses, and Abraham.
"I have chanced upon weeds, my brothers, That wear the color of wheat, To choke the good seed."
According to tradition, Ephrem began to write hymns in order to counteract the heresies that were rampant at that time. For those who think of hymns simply as the song at the end of Mass that keeps us from leaving the church early, it may come as a surprise that Ephrem and others recognized and developed the power of music to get their points across. Tradition tells us that Ephrem heard the heretical ideas put into song first and in order to counteract them made up his own hymns. In the one below, his target is a Syrian heretic Bardesan who denied the truth of the Resurrection:
"How he blasphemes justice, And grace her fellow-worker. For if the body was not raised, This is a great insult against grace, To say grace created the body for decay; And this is slander against justice, to say justice sends the body to destruction."
The originality, imagery, and skill of his hymns captured the hearts of the Christians so well, that Ephrem is given credit for awakening the Church to the important of music and poetry in spreading and fortifying the faith.
Ephrem’s home was in physical as well as spiritual danger. Nisibis, a target of Shapur II, the King of Persia, was besieged by him three times. During the third siege in in 350, Shapur’s engineers turned the river out of its course in order to flood the city as Ephrem describes (speaking as Nisibis):
"All kinds of storms trouble me — and you have been kinder to the Ark: only waves surrounded it, but ramps and weapons and waves surround me… O Helmsman of the Ark, be my pilot on dry land! You gave the Ark rest on the haven of a mountain, give me rest in the haven of my walls."
The flood, however, turned the tide against Shapur. When he tried to invade he found his army obstructed by the very waters and ruin he had caused. The defenders of the city, including Ephrem, took advantage of the chaos to ambush the invaders and drive them out.
"He has saved us without wall, and taught us that He is our wall: He has saved us without king and made us know that is our king: He has saved us, in each and all, and showed us that He is All."
In the end, however, Nisibis lost. When Shapur defeated the Roman emperor Jovian, he demanded the city as part of the treaty. Jovian not only gave him the city but agreed to force the Christians to leave Nisibis. Probably in his fifties or sixties at that time, Ephrem was one of the refugees who fled the city in 363.
Sometime in 364 he settled as a solitary ascetic on Mount Edessa, at Edessa (what is now Urfa) 100 miles east of his home.
"The soul is your bride, the body is your bridal chamber…"
Heresy and danger followed him to Edessa. The Arian Emperor Valens camped outside of Edessa threatening to kill all the Christian inhabitants if they did not submit. But Valens was the one forced to give up in the face of the courage and steadfastness of the Edessans (fortified by Ephrem’s hymns):
"The doors of her homes Edessa Left open when she went forth With the pastor to the grave, to die, And not depart from her faith. Let the city and fort and building And houses be yielded to the king; Our goods and our gold let us leave; So we part not from our faith!"
Tradition tells us that during the famine that hit Edessa in 372, Ephrem was horrified to learn that some citizens were hoarding food. When he confronted them, he received the age-old excuse that they couldn’t find a fair way or honest person to distribute the food. Ephrem immediately volunteered himself and it is a sign of how respected he was that no one was able to argue with this choice. He and his helpers worked diligently to get food to the needy in the city and the surrounding area.
The famine ended in a year of abundant harvest the following year and Ephrem died shortly thereafter, as we are told, at an advanced age. We do not know the exact date or year of his death but June 9, 373 is accepted by many. Ephrem relates in his dying testament a childhood vision of his life that he gloriousl fulfilled:
"There grew a vine-shoot on my tongue: and increased and reached unto heaven, And it yielded fruit without measure: leaves likewise without number. It spread, it stretched wide, it bore fruit: all creation drew near, And the more they were that gathered: the more its clusters abounded. These clusters were the Homilies; and these leaves the Hymns. God was the giver of them: glory to Him for His grace! For He gave to me of His good pleasure: from the storehouse of His treasures."

http://catholiconline.org

    goandannouce:

    A Saint a day: June 9

    St. Ephrem

    Died: 373?

    "I was born in the way of truth: though my childhood was unaware of the greatness of the benefit, I knew it when trial came."

    Ephrem (or Eprhaim) the Syrian left us hundreds of hymns and poems on the faith that inflamed and inspired the whole Church, but few facts about his own inspiring life.

    Most historians infer from the lines quoted above that Ephrem was born into a Christian family — although not baptized until an adult (the trial or furnace), which was common at the time. Other than that little is known about his birth and youth although many guess he was born in the early fourth century in Mesopotamia, possibly in Nisibis where he spent most of his adult life.

    Ephrem served as teacher, and possibly deacon, under four bishops of Nisibis, Jacob, Babu, Vologeses, and Abraham.

    "I have chanced upon weeds, my brothers, That wear the color of wheat, To choke the good seed."

    According to tradition, Ephrem began to write hymns in order to counteract the heresies that were rampant at that time. For those who think of hymns simply as the song at the end of Mass that keeps us from leaving the church early, it may come as a surprise that Ephrem and others recognized and developed the power of music to get their points across. Tradition tells us that Ephrem heard the heretical ideas put into song first and in order to counteract them made up his own hymns. In the one below, his target is a Syrian heretic Bardesan who denied the truth of the Resurrection:

    "How he blasphemes justice, And grace her fellow-worker. For if the body was not raised, This is a great insult against grace, To say grace created the body for decay; And this is slander against justice, to say justice sends the body to destruction."

    The originality, imagery, and skill of his hymns captured the hearts of the Christians so well, that Ephrem is given credit for awakening the Church to the important of music and poetry in spreading and fortifying the faith.

    Ephrem’s home was in physical as well as spiritual danger. Nisibis, a target of Shapur II, the King of Persia, was besieged by him three times. During the third siege in in 350, Shapur’s engineers turned the river out of its course in order to flood the city as Ephrem describes (speaking as Nisibis):

    "All kinds of storms trouble me — and you have been kinder to the Ark: only waves surrounded it, but ramps and weapons and waves surround me… O Helmsman of the Ark, be my pilot on dry land! You gave the Ark rest on the haven of a mountain, give me rest in the haven of my walls."

    The flood, however, turned the tide against Shapur. When he tried to invade he found his army obstructed by the very waters and ruin he had caused. The defenders of the city, including Ephrem, took advantage of the chaos to ambush the invaders and drive them out.

    "He has saved us without wall, and taught us that He is our wall: He has saved us without king and made us know that is our king: He has saved us, in each and all, and showed us that He is All."

    In the end, however, Nisibis lost. When Shapur defeated the Roman emperor Jovian, he demanded the city as part of the treaty. Jovian not only gave him the city but agreed to force the Christians to leave Nisibis. Probably in his fifties or sixties at that time, Ephrem was one of the refugees who fled the city in 363.

    Sometime in 364 he settled as a solitary ascetic on Mount Edessa, at Edessa (what is now Urfa) 100 miles east of his home.

    "The soul is your bride, the body is your bridal chamber…"

    Heresy and danger followed him to Edessa. The Arian Emperor Valens camped outside of Edessa threatening to kill all the Christian inhabitants if they did not submit. But Valens was the one forced to give up in the face of the courage and steadfastness of the Edessans (fortified by Ephrem’s hymns):

    "The doors of her homes Edessa Left open when she went forth With the pastor to the grave, to die, And not depart from her faith. Let the city and fort and building And houses be yielded to the king; Our goods and our gold let us leave; So we part not from our faith!"

    Tradition tells us that during the famine that hit Edessa in 372, Ephrem was horrified to learn that some citizens were hoarding food. When he confronted them, he received the age-old excuse that they couldn’t find a fair way or honest person to distribute the food. Ephrem immediately volunteered himself and it is a sign of how respected he was that no one was able to argue with this choice. He and his helpers worked diligently to get food to the needy in the city and the surrounding area.

    The famine ended in a year of abundant harvest the following year and Ephrem died shortly thereafter, as we are told, at an advanced age. We do not know the exact date or year of his death but June 9, 373 is accepted by many. Ephrem relates in his dying testament a childhood vision of his life that he gloriousl fulfilled:

    "There grew a vine-shoot on my tongue: and increased and reached unto heaven, And it yielded fruit without measure: leaves likewise without number. It spread, it stretched wide, it bore fruit: all creation drew near, And the more they were that gathered: the more its clusters abounded. These clusters were the Homilies; and these leaves the Hymns. God was the giver of them: glory to Him for His grace! For He gave to me of His good pleasure: from the storehouse of His treasures."

    http://catholiconline.org

    • 1 month ago
    • 17
    silvestromedia:

St. Ephrem.  Roman Catholic Doctor of the Church, he is given credit for awakening the Church to the important of music and poetry in spreading and fortifying the faith. Feast day June 09

    silvestromedia:

    St. Ephrem. Roman Catholic Doctor of the Church, he is given credit for awakening the Church to the important of music and poetry in spreading and fortifying the faith. Feast day June 09

    • 1 month ago
    • 13

    "The word of God is a tree of life that offers us blessed fruit from each of its branches. It is like that rock which was struck open in the wilderness, from which all were offered spiritual drink. Be glad then that you are overwhelmed, and do not be saddened because he has overcome you. A thirsty person is happy when drinking, and not depressed, because the spring is inexhaustible. You can satisfy your thirst without exhausting the spring; then when you thirst again, you can drink from it once more."

    Ephrem the Syrian (via williamguice)

    • 1 month ago
    • 10

    http://ihidaya.tumblr.com/post/51880571568/ephrem-of-syria-from-the-pearl-on-a-certain

    ihidaya:

    Ephrem of Syria, from ‘The Pearl:’

    On a certain day a pearl did I take up, my brethren;
    I saw in it mysteries pertaining to the Kingdom;
    Semblances and types of the Majesty;
    It became a fountain, and I drank out of it mysteries of the Son.

    I put it, my brethren, upon the palm of my hand,

    • 1 month ago
    • 5

    Were I to sum up my first year of priestly ministry: the film the Seven Samurai. I spend most of my time recruiting student leaders for retreats.

    • 1 month ago
    • 4

    kapustadiamond:

    Oh Catholic Worker, I am so glad you exist. 

    • 1 month ago
    • 263

    To become an inactive tumblr user?

    stereoma:

    It’s a great thing to have good priests and religious who are active in online communities. But you can’t expect to get popular or part of the in crowd automatically. Anyone who has grown up on the internet can tell you that it’s a fickle beast, with lots of good stuff and lots of trash. People aren’t going to just listen to you because you’re not a layman.  You’ve got to build up your following, and like any other ministry, you’re not going to get much immediate validation. And then when you do finally start winning some sweet internet points and popularity, it’s going to be completely unexpected. People who are popular have sunk hundreds of hours over years to get where they are. 

    I have actually been on here for 4 1/2 years, and built up a following. The following has ceased to use tumblr, and it says nothing about my effectiveness as a minister. I actually did get enough validation to continue going on here, but that has stopped over a year ago. I am not asking for help getting something started, I am asking for help on whether I should hold onto something that seems to have ceased being relevant.

    • 2 months ago
    • 21